FCPA Compliance and Ethics Blog

June 17, 2015

Never Tick Off a Redbird

Angry RedbirdAt a Press Conference today, Satan officially announced that Hell has frozen over. He made this stunning announcement after the New York Times (NYT) reported that the baseball team with the most World Series wins in the history of the National League (NL), the St. Louis Cardinals, had hacked those paragons of virtue, enormity and the very symbol of baseball greatness, the Houston Astros, to view confidential information. The Cardinals have managed to win 5 World Series in the past 50 years; how many World Series have the Astros won? That would be a big fat nada, ZERO, none, zilch. The NL team with the most World Series wins in the past 50 years was caught hacking into the inner most secrets of one of the worst teams in that same time period. Where are Tom Brady’s deflated balls when you need them?

As reported by Michael Schmidt, in a piece entitled “Cardinals Face F.B.I. Inquiry in Hacking of Astros’ Network, Major League Baseball (MLB) asked the FBI and Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate the hacking of the Astros “Last year, some of the information was posted anonymously online, according to an article on Deadspin. Among the details that were exposed were trade discussions that the Astros had with other teams. No doubt expecting that nefarious rogue agents of the Chinese government (or worse-the Chinese military) were seeking to wreck havoc on the game once known as ‘America’s pastime’ or “Believing that the Astros’ network had been compromised by a rogue hacker, Major League Baseball notified the F.B.I., and the authorities in Houston opened an investigation. Agents soon found that the Astros’ network had been entered from a computer at a home that some Cardinals officials had lived in. The agents then turned their attention to the team’s front office.” Oops, those darn Chinese; they are never around to blame when you need them.

So move aside New England Patriots, with your petty attempts to manipulate footballs in a championship game. Stop allowing your quarterback to dictate how he uses the tools of his trade, footballs. Do not cheat and call it getting an edge; all of this makes you look like rank amateurs next to the St. Louis Cardinals. Act like a real team and enlist your front office executives to steal information from the worst team in football. For long term pathetic-ness, you might try the Oakland Raiders or just go with the current joke of a team, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers whose No. One draft pick, and now face of the franchise, was one of the most ‘ethically challenged’ college players in recent years. If you really want great information about poor football, steal it from the Jacksonville Jaguars. Bill Belichek, you are only limited by your imagination!

As to the Cardinals, what on earth could the Astros have that they could possibly want? Take the Astros record over the past five years; it’s the worst in baseball. You want a piece of that? How about secret information on the leadership savoir fare of the Astros owner ‘Mr. I am smarter than everyone in the room because I made a $100mm in business’ Jim Crane. Why be one of the best-run sports franchises, when you can mimic the Astros? First you can tell everyone how stupid they are because they do not understand how it is in your interest to try and lose; next why you should cut off over 70% of your fan base from even watching games on television so they will not see your joke of a team play and, finally, how to sue the prior owner who sold you the team for mis-representing the quality of the assets.

But do not stop with the owner. The apparent ire of St. Louis (never under-estimate a pissed off Redbird) was directed at a former Cardinal employee who left to become the General Manager of the Astros, Jeff Luhnow. Apparently the Cardinals were upset that the baseball knowledge in Luhnow’s head was now being used by the Astros. (Did I mention the Astros had baseball’s worst record for the past 5 years?) Of course, perhaps the Cardinals could learn how make an offer to the top draft pick in the annual amateur draft and then withdraw the offer so they could make a lower one, thereby losing two top draft picks. That certainly was a brilliant move by the Astros that you would want to use going forward.

The Cardinals action brings up one of the greatest areas of corporate angst; when a business gets its feelings hurt. Heaven forbid. No doubt having recently seen a recent late night showing of the movie Animal House the Cardinals decided not to get mad; they decided to get even. So with this newfound information gleaned from the Astros, it now clear how the Cardinals have been so successful. Not simply being content to cheat, they broke the law to hack into the confidential information of another baseball team to learn that other team’s secret. Now I know why the Astros have been so bad over the years; they had all their confidential information sucked out of their organization by the evil Cardinals. So that giant sucking sound you hear from south Texas is not American jobs going to Mexico because of NAFTA but all the confidential information being sucked out of the Houston Astros.

What are the lessons for a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) or compliance practitioner? One lesson is it points to the myriad of reasons that companies and individuals engage in bribery and corruption. It is laughable to think that the St. Louis Cardinals, one of the best-run franchises’ in all of sports (or so we thought); could learn anything from the idiots who run the Astros. Yet here we are; out of spite, vindictiveness or just plain old malevolence, front office executives of the Cardinals engaged in conduct that has drawn the scrutiny of the FBI and DOJ. This points to other motivations than fidelity to monetary gain as a reason for bribery and corruption.

Also, cybersecurity is a compliance concern. What protocols to you have in place to protect your data? How will you respond to a breach? What happens if another member of the cartel your business is in engages in criminal activity against you? Will you demand that they are kicked out of the cartel?

I think it also points up how actually Doing Compliance differs from having a paper compliance program in place. Whether you use the McNulty’s Maxims formulations (What did you do to prevent? What did you do to detect it? What did you do after you found out about it?) or the FCPA Guidance formulation that a best practices compliance program should prevent, detect and remedy violations. I am relatively certain the St. Louis Cardinals had a policy against breaking the law by hacking into the database of another baseball team. With equal certainty, I am sure the Cardinals had no program to prevent or detect such illegal conduct for if they did, it would certainly appear they conveniently looked the other way.

Finally, American businesses need to wise up. Stop all the whining, moaning and complaining about data breaches from Chinese/Russian/Bulgarian/the Galactic Empire/the Borg/(name your Evil Empire); you are most at risk from other US companies. For if the best team in the history of the NL will break the law to steal the trade secrets and confidential information of one of the worst teams, is anyone safe? Further, what are the chances that the Cardinals have been trying to steal trade secrets from winning teams? That would be a number way too high for me to even imagine. Quit crying to Congress that it is unfair for you to be required to protect your own data or that it would cost you money or jobs; secure your data now.

Now for a free tip from my consulting company, Advanced Compliance Solutions-if you have super-secret confidential information, make sure it password protected. But more than simply password protected, change you password every 90 days. That is a good first step in case the St. Louis Cardinals come hacking your company.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

June 12, 2015

Tribute to Sir Christopher Lee and Release of New Book for CCOs

Lee as DraculaSir Christopher Lee died yesterday. For several generations of horror movie fans, he was simply Dracula, having starred in the role for Hammer Films in the 1950s through the 1980s. Yet for another couple of generations of movie aficionados, he was known for his work in the later Star Wars series as Count Dooku in both Star Wars: Episode II — Attack of the Clones and in Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith. He was also the wizard Saruman in Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films.

His characterization of Dracula may have been closer to what Dracula’s creator, Bram Stoker, had envisioned. According to his obituary in The Telegraph, Lee “imbued the character with a dynamic, feral quality that had been lacking in earlier portrayals.” The first Hammer Dracula film was the most successful. The Telegraph stated, “With Cushing cast this time as the vampire hunter, Dracula (retitled Horror of Dracula in America) was a box-office success for Hammer and horror aficionados at the time labelled it “the greatest horror movie ever made”. Lee also regarded it as the best of the series of Dracula films that he made with Hammer. “It’s the only one I’ve done that’s any good,” he recalled. “It’s the only one that remotely resembles the book.””

Lee’s creativeness and greatness in the roles he has played lead-in to my topic today. I am extremely pleased to announce that my latest book CCO 2.0 | Internal Marketer and Soft Skills Required has been published and is now available from Compliance Week. CCO 2.0 provides the Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) and compliance practitioner with some of the most current ideas on the types of skills that a compliance officer might need and how to market the compliance function within the corporate environment.

In the Internal Marketer section, I take on such topics as The Five Golden Rules of Internal Marketing Compliance; Internal Marketing of a Compliance Program; Getting Employees to Care about a Compliance Program; Getting Your Employees to Internally Market Your Compliance Program; Internal Advertising of Your Compliance Program and Funding Your Compliance Program.

In the sections of soft skills I discuss skills the CCO or compliance practitioner can use to move forward the compliance agenda in a company. I discuss such topics as the use of influence by a CCO; Four Keys to Compliance Leadership; the CCO as Chief Persuasion Officer; the CCO as Chief Collaboration Officer; Communications tips for the compliance professional; putting compliance at the center of strategy and why compliance is different than legal function.

The book is available in paperback and eBook formats and you can find both by clicking here.

While you are on the Compliance Week site, I would also suggest that you take at look at my seminal work on creation, implementation and enhancement of an anti-corruption compliance program, Doing Compliance. If there is one book in your library on how to do compliance, this book is it. In this book I discuss the requirements to build, and execute, a modern compliance program. With a focus on anti-bribery and anti-corruption issues, the book first reviews the basic building blocks a compliance officer needs (code of conduct, policies and procedures, internal controls), moves on to address the proper role and autonomy of a CCO, delves into the most important CCO duties (risk assessment, training, investigations), and always offers practical examples and advice for how a compliance program should work.

Best of all, the paperback and eBook both have newly reduced pricing which should make it a ‘must have’ for every member of your compliance team. The book is available by clicking here.

Finally, if you have not yet checked out my podcasts, after you check out my latest two books, published by Compliance Week, you should head over to the FCPA Compliance and Ethics Report or iTunes to check out the latest editions. Some of the highlights are:

Episodes 163 and 166 deal with the FIFA indictments.

Episode 164 – MissionLogPodcast.com co-host John Champion returns to discuss Star Trek – The Next Generation (TNG) and the leadership lessons from Season One of TNG.

Episode 165 – I discuss the BHP FCPA enforcement action and its implications for the compliance practitioner as a strict liability standard because there was no evidence of bribery presented by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Episode 167 – Mara Senn returns to share her top ten practices for cross-border investigations. Senn has some important and useful tips to help the CCO or compliance practitioner think through an approach for an international FCPA investigation.

Episode 168 – Noted criminal defense attorney Dan Cogdell discusses criminal procedure and funding your defense costs, in the defense of an individual Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) enforcement action. With all the talk coming about the Department of Justice (DOJ) and FCPA commentariat about the need for individual prosecutions, this episode is timely.

Lastly, after you have purchased my two latest books and checked out my podcasts, I would urge you to head on over to Netflix and settle in with Sir Christopher Lee and his great Hammer films. They are the top of 1950s horror movies.

A happy weekend to all.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

May 29, 2015

Doing Compliance in an Economic Downturn, Part IV – Testing, Peer Groups and Talent Development

Edmund HillaryToday we celebrate the conquest of what the Tibetans call “Mother Goddess of the Land” and what the rest of us call Mount Everest. For on this date in 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tenzing Norgay, a Nepalese Sherpa, became the first explorers to reach the summit of the highest point on earth. News of the success was rushed by runner from the expedition’s base camp to the radio post at Namche Bazar, and then sent by coded message to London, where Queen Elizabeth II learned of the achievement on June 1, the eve of her coronation. The next day, the news broke around the world. Later that year, Hillary and Norgay were both honored by the queen for their momentous achievement.

One of the things that made Hillary and Norgay’s ascent to the summit of Everest was the overall integration and teamwork of the entire group. The British team was led by Colonel John Hunt who set up a series of camps, allowing the expedition to push its way up the mountain in April and May. A new passage was forged through several previously un-surmounted obstacles to bring the team to about 26,000 feet. The first assault to the summit was launched on May 26 by Charles Evans and Tom Bourdillon, however they had to abandon their assent 300 feet from the top due to malfunctioning oxygen sets. Three days later, Hillary and Norgay were successful. In other words, teamwork and process were key to their success.

The accomplishment achieved by Hillary and Norgay drives the conclusion of my series on the steps you can take to improve your Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) anti-corruption compliance program and overall compliance function during a period of economic downturn. So when faced with reduced monetary resources and lessened head count you might want to consider the teamwork of compliance. To that end you might use a strategy of developing compliance talent and relationships for the compliance function. You could initiate a compliance talent development group where you rotate high potential individuals in your company through the compliance function in some manner.

My suggestion would be to work with senior management and your Human Resources (HR) function to identify some of the key talent within your company. They can come from any other area of the company; such as accounting, finance, internal audit, HR itself, sales or any other discipline. From there you can task them to lead a working group on a compliance related project. The project itself can be any project you would like to try and implement when funding becomes more available.

One company I worked at had such an organization called the President’s Team which was an annual group that developed projects for the company Chief Executive Officer (CEO). The concept is the same but the goal is having the high talent employees learn more about compliance. Equally important for you as the compliance practitioner is to develop relationships with such up and comers so you can access to them if they continue to progress up the corporate chain. Remember it is important to have relationships with those in power and those who will be in power.

In addition to the talent development group, you should also revisit your interactions with your Board or Audit Committee. You need to re-emphasize to them their responsibility for compliance going forward and that it will not diminish simply because the price of oil has gone south or any other reason why you may be in an economic downturn. If there are emergency projects or others which you believe should take priority this would be a good time to inform and educate the Board on them so that you can continue to maintain as much funding as is possible. This could come into play if you have a number of whistleblower complaints to triage and review in short order due to employee layoffs. But if you did not establish those relationships ‘yesterday’, you probably cannot call on them ‘tomorrow’ so you need to make sure they are in place now.

Another idea that you can try is something along the lines of a client advisory committee or peer group review. You can put together a peer group to help advise your compliance function. After all, one of your constituent groups is your employee base. So why not turn to that group to find out what is working and perhaps their views on what is not, in their eyes, from the compliance function. If they can provide feedback to you on how to streamline a compliance process you might well be able to incorporate such suggestions going forward. They will be aware of the resource constraints the company is under so it could be an avenue which you have not previously used. Further, as with the talent development group concept, you would have the opportunity to develop relationships with other leaders in your organization. Finally, the group would have greater investment in the compliance function going forward.

Next is one of your highest risks, that of third parties, which most compliance practitioners recognize as their highest risk in any FCPA anti-corruption compliance program. This risk does not lessen simply because of a downturn. My suggestion is that you test and review all of the indicia around the lifecycle of your third party risk management program. This is not a forensic audit or even standards that an auditor might use. But you can test and you can test the documentation around your program at little to no cost.

The lifecycle of a third party is the following: (1) Business justification, (2) Questionnaire, (3) Due Diligence and Evaluation, (4) Contract negotiation, and (5) Managing the relationship thereafter. You can perform testing on all of these steps by reviewing the documentation in your third party database. For each third party you should confirm that there is documentation in each file, which supports each of the five prongs. In addition to the document, document, document aspect of this exercise, you can also use it as a cross-check on your internal control mapping for each validated prong so this can also be considered an internal compliance control.

I hope that you have found some of these ideas for improving your compliance function in an economic downturn useful. Perhaps they have stimulated ideas or discussions within your organizations going forward. If you have any other ideas which you would be willing to share, I hope that you will pass them along to me. We are all in this compliance ride together anything we all can do to move things forward is progress in my mind.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

May 27, 2015

Economic Downturn Week, Part II – The Golden Gate Bridge and Employment Separation – Hotlines and Whistleblowers During Layoffs

Golden Gate BridgeToday, we celebrate one of the greatest engineering achievements of the century. On this date in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge opened. At 4200 feet long, it was at the time the world’s longest suspension bridge. But not only was it an engineering and architectural milestone, its aesthetic form was instantly recognized as classical and to this day is one of the most iconic structures in the US if not the world. With just a few years until its 80th birthday, it demonstrates that a lasting structure is more than simply form following function but contains many elements that inform its use and beauty.

I use the Golden Gate Bridge as an entrée to my continued discussion on the series on steps that you can use in your compliance program if you find yourself, your company or your industry in an economic downturn. Whether you are a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) or compliance practitioner, these steps are designed to be achieved when you face reduced economic resources or lessened personnel resources going forward due to a downturn your economic sector. Yesterday, I discussed mapping your current and existing internal controls to the Ten Hallmarks of an Effective Compliance Program so that you can demonstrate your compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act’s (FCPA) internal control prong to the accounting procedures. Today I want to discuss the issues surrounding the inevitable layoffs your company will have to endure in a downturn.

In Houston, we have experienced energy companies laying off upwards of 30% of their workforce, both in the US and abroad. Employment separations can be one of the trickiest maneuvers to manage in the spectrum of the employment relationship. Even when an employee is aware layoffs are coming it can still be quite a shock when Human Resources (HR) shows up at their door and says, “Come with me.” However, layoffs, massive or otherwise, can present some unique challenges for the FCPA compliance practitioner. Employees can use layoffs to claim that they were retaliated against for a wide variety of complaints, including those for concerns that impact the compliance practitioner. Yet there are several actions you can take to protect your company as much as possible.

Before you begin your actual layoffs, the compliance practitioner should work with your legal department and HR function to make certain your employment separation documents are in compliance with the recent SEC v. KBR Cease and Desist Order regarding Confidentiality Agreement (CA) language which purports to prevent employees from bringing potential violations to appropriate law or regulatory enforcement officials. If your company requires employees to be presented with some type of CA to receive company approved employment severance package, it must not have language preventing an employee taking such action. But this means more than having appropriate or even approved language in your CA, as you must counsel those who will be talking to the employee being laid off, not to even hint at retaliation if they go to authorities with a good faith belief of illegal conduct. You might even suggest, adding the SEC/KBR language to your script so the person leading the conversation at the layoff can get it right and you have a documented record of what was communicated to the employee being separated.

When it comes to interacting with employees first thing any company needs to do, is to treat employees with as much respect and dignity as is possible in the situation. While every company says they care (usually the same companies which say they are very ethical), the reality is that many simply want terminated employees out the door and off the premises as quickly as possibly. At times this will include an ‘escort’ off the premises and the clear message is that not only do we not trust you but do not let the door hit you on the way out. This attitude can go a long way to starting an employee down the road of filing a claim for retaliation or, in the case of FCPA enforcement, becoming a whistleblower to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), identifying bribery and corruption.

Treating employees with respect means listening to them and not showing them the door as quickly as possible with an escort. From the FCPA compliance perspective this could also mean some type of conversation to ask the soon-to-be parting employee if they are aware of any FCPA violations, violations of your Code of Conduct or any other conduct which might raise ethical or conflict of interest concerns. You might even get them to sign some type of document that attests they are not aware of any such conduct. I recognize that this may not protect your company in all instances but at least it is some evidence that you can use later if the SEC (or Department of Justice (DOJ)) comes calling after that ex-employee has blown the whistle on your organization.

I would suggest that you work with your HR department to have an understanding of any high-risk employees who might be subject to layoffs. While you could consider having HR conduct this portion of the exit interview, it might be better if a compliance practitioner was involved. Obviously a compliance practitioner would be better able to ask detailed questions if some issue arose but it would also emphasize just how important the issue of FCPA compliance, Code of Conduct compliance or simply ethical conduct compliance was and remains to your business.

Finally are issues around hotlines, whistleblower and retaliation claims. The starting point for layoffs should be whatever your company plan is going forward. The retaliation cases turn on whether actions taken by the company were in retaliation for the hotline or whistleblower report. This means you will need to mine your hotline more closely for those employees who are scheduled or in line to be laid off. If there are such persons who have reported a FCPA, Code of Conduct or other ethical violation, you should move to triage and investigate, if appropriate, the allegation sooner rather than later. This may mean you move up research of an allegation to come to a faster resolution ahead of other claims. It may also mean you put some additional short-term resources on your hotline triage and investigations if you know layoffs are coming.

The reason for these actions are to allow you to demonstrate that any laid off employee was not separated because of a hotline or whistleblower allegation but due to your overall layoff scheme. However it could be that you may need this person to provide your compliance department additional information, to be a resource to you going forward, or even a witness that you can reasonably anticipate the government may want to interview. If any of these situations exist, if you do not plan for their eventuality before you layoff the employee, said (now) ex-employee may not be inclined to cooperate with you going forward. Also if you do demonstrate that you are sincerely interested in a meritorious hotline complaint, it may keep this person from becoming a SEC whistleblower.

Just as the Golden Gate Bridge provides more to the human condition than simply a structure to get from San Francisco to Marin County, layoffs in an economic downturn provide many opportunities to companies. If they treat the situation appropriately, it can be one where you manage your FCPA compliance risk going forward.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

 

 

 

April 28, 2015

King Arthur Week – the Pentecostal Oath and Code of Conduct – Part II

Mort D'ArthurOne thing for which King Arthur is remembered are his chivalric knights. He helped create this legend, in large part, by establishing a Code of Conduct for the Knights of the Round Table. The King required each one of them to swear an oath, called the Pentecostal Oath, which was Arthur’s ideal for a chivalric knight. The Oath stated, “The king established all his knights, and gave them that were of lands not rich, he gave them lands, and charged them never to do outrageousity nor murder, and always to flee treason; also, by no mean to be cruel, but to give mercy unto him that asketh mercy, upon pain of forfeiture of their worship and lordship of King Arthur for evermore; and always to do ladies, damosels, and gentlewomen succor upon pain of death. Also, that no man take no battles in a wrongful quarrel for no law, ne for no world’s goods. Unto this were all the knights sworn of the Table Round, both old and young. And every year were they sworn at the high feast of Pentecost.” (Le Morte d’Arthur, pp 115-116)

Interestingly, the Oath first appeared in Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur and in none of the prior incarnations of the legend. In Malory’s telling, after the Knights swore the Oath, they were provided titles and lands by the King. The Oath specifies both positive and negative conduct; that is, what a Knight might do but also what conduct he should not engage in. The Pentecostal Oath formed the basis for the Knight’s conduct at Camelot and beyond. It was clearly a forerunner of today’s corporate Code of Conduct.

The foundational document of any Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) compliance program is its Code of Conduct. This requirement has long been memorialized in the US Sentencing Guidelines, which contain seven basic compliance elements that can be tailored to fit the needs and financial realities of any given organization. From these seven compliance elements the Department of Justice (DOJ) has crafted its minimum best practices compliance program, which is now attached to every Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) and Non-Prosecution Agreement (NPA). These requirements were incorporated into the 2012 FCPA Guidance. The US Sentencing Guidelines assume that every effective compliance and ethics program begins with a written standard of conduct; i.e. a Code of Conduct. What should be in this “written standard of conduct”.

Element 1

Standards of Conduct, Policies and Procedures (a Code of Conduct)

An organization should have an established set of compliance standards and procedures. These standards should not be a “paper only” document, but a living document that promotes organizational culture that encourages “ethical conduct” and a commitment to compliance with applicable regulations and laws.

In the FCPA Guidance, the DOJ and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) state, “A company’s code of conduct is often the foundation upon which an effective compliance program is built. As DOJ has repeatedly noted in its charging documents, the most effective codes are clear, concise, and accessible to all employees and to those conducting business on the company’s behalf.” Indeed, it would be difficult to effectively implement a compliance program if it was not available in the local language so that employees in foreign subsidiaries can access and understand it. When assessing a compliance program the DOJ and SEC will review whether the company chapter has taken steps to make certain that the code of conduct remains current and effective and whether a company has periodically reviewed and updated its code.

In each DPA and NPA over the past 36 months the DOJ has stated the following as item No. 1 for a minimum best practices compliance program.

  1. Code of Conduct. A Company should develop and promulgate a clearly articulated and visible corporate policy against violations of the FCPA, including its anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions, and other applicable foreign law counterparts (collectively, the “anti-corruption laws”), which policy shall be memorialized in a written compliance code.

In an article in the Society for Corporate Compliance and Ethics (SCCE) Complete Compliance and Ethics Manual, 2nd Ed., entitled “Essential Elements of an Effective Ethics and Compliance Program”, authors Debbie Troklus, Greg Warner and Emma Wollschlager Schwartz, state that your company’s Code of Conduct “should demonstrate a complete ethical attitude and your organization’s “system-wide” emphasis on compliance and ethics with all applicable laws and regulations.” Your Code of Conduct must be aimed at all employees and all representatives of the organization, not just those most actively involved in known compliance and ethics issues. From the board of directors to volunteers, the authors believe that “everyone must receive, read, understand, and agree to abide by the standards of the Code of Conduct.” This would also include all “management, vendors, suppliers, and independent contractors, which are frequently overlooked groups.”

There are several purposes identified by the authors that should be communicated in your Code of Conduct. Of course the overriding goal is for all employees to follow what is required of them under the Code of Conduct. You can do this by communicating what is required of them, to provide a process for proper decision-making and then to require that all persons subject to the Code of Conduct put these standards into everyday business practice. Such actions are some of your best evidence that your company “upholds and supports proper compliance conduct.”

The substance of your Code of Conduct should be tailored to the company’s culture, and to its industry and corporate identity. It should provide a mechanism by which employees who are trying to do the right thing in the compliance and business ethics arena can do so. The Code of Conduct can be used as a basis for employee review and evaluation. It should certainly be invoked if there is a violation. To that end, I suggest that your company’s disciplinary procedures be stated in the Code of Conduct. These would include all forms of disciplines, up to and including dismissal, for serious violations of the Code of Conduct. Further, your company’s Code of Conduct should emphasize it will comply with all applicable laws and regulations, wherever it does business. The Code needs to be written in plain English and translated into other languages as necessary so that all applicable persons can understand it.

As I often say, the three most important things about your FCPA compliance program are ‘Document, Document and Document’. The same is true of communicating your company’s Code of Conduct. You need to do more than simply put it on your website and tell folks it is there, available and that they should read it. You need to document that all employees, or anyone else that your Code of Conduct is applicable to, has received, read, and understands the Code. For employees, it is important that a representative of the Compliance Department, or other qualified trainer, explains the standards set forth in your Code of Conduct and answers any questions that an employee may have. Your company’s employees need to attest in writing that they have received, read, and understood the Code of Conduct and this attestation must be retained and updated as appropriate.

The DOJ expects each company to begin its compliance program with a very public and very robust Code of Conduct. If your company does not have one, you need to implement one forthwith. If your company has not reviewed or assessed their Code of Conduct for five years, I would suggest that you do in short order as much has changed in the compliance world.

What is the value of having a Code of Conduct? I have heard many business folks ask that question over the years. In its early days, a Code of Conduct tended to be lawyer-written and lawyer-driven to “wave in a defense situation” by claiming that “see we have one”. But is such a legalistic code effective? Is a Code of Conduct more than simply, your company’s law? What is it that makes a Code of Conduct effective? What should be the goal in the creation of your company’s Code of Conduct?

Just as the Pentecostal Oath was required to be sworn out each year, you should have your employees recertify their adherence to your Code of Conduct. Moreover, just as King Arthur set his expectations for behavior your company should do so as well.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

April 9, 2015

Lee Surrenders and Hanson Wade’s Oil & Gas Supply Chain Compliance Conference

Lee and GrantToday we celebrate one of the most momentous anniversary’s in the history of the United States, for it was on this day in 1865, 150 years ago, that Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to Union Commanding General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse, effectively ending the American Civil War. Fighting continued for several more weeks to come, however with Lee’s surrender the Civil War had, in all intents and purposes, ended.

Lee and his troops were forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, they were blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and were harassed and outrun by Union cavalry, who took 6,000 prisoners at Sayler’s Creek. With desertions mounting daily the Confederates were surrounded with no possibility of escape. On April 9, Lee sent a message to Grant announcing his willingness to surrender and in the afternoon they met at the home of Wilmer McLean and agreed to the terms of surrender.

Although politicians would later change these terms quite dramatically, Grant is said to have told his officers, “The war is over. The Rebels are our countrymen again.”

Later this month, from April 28-30, Hanson Wade is putting on its annual conference in Houston. It is the “Oil and Gas Supply Chain Compliance” conference, now in its 5th year, and once again the list of speakers is simply stunning. It includes the following Chief Compliance Officers (CCOs) and senior compliance folks: Dan Chapman, Cameron; Brian Moffatt, Ethos Energy, Jay Martin, Baker Hughes; Marcel De Chermont, Acteon Group, Jan Farley, Dresser-Rand; John Sardar, Noble Energy and a host of other luminaries in the field of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) compliance. Even if you live outside of Houston, the FCPA compliance talent at this event will rival any other event in the US and for such an event not held in Washington DC or New York City, it is simply outstanding.

Some of the panels and topics for discussion include: Applying Culturally Sensitive Approaches To Deliver A Core Compliance Methodology For A Variety Of Countries And Risks; How to Meaningfully Engage Your Business Operations in Taking Greater Compliance Ownership; Avoid The Risk Of Cavalier Behaviour Across The Supply Chain In The Face Of A Challenging Economic Climate; How To Deliver Cost-Effective, Risk Based, Function Specific Compliance Training; several in-depth presentations on Supply Chain and Third Party due diligence. These are but some of the sessions and there are many other excellent panels, sessions and speakers which I have not mentioned.

Recently the Event’s Chairperson, Dan Chapman, Vice President, Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer for Cameron, talked about some of the issues that will be discussed in this year’s conference. Chapman said, “Supply chain is, in my mind, a critical part of compliance and creating awareness throughout the business as to when and where you should apply compliance principles is a key focus. For me the industry has evolved in recent years, and our organizations tend to now have strong legal teams who understand anti-bribery and corruption legislation. Not only this, they now have the ‘tone from the top’. Where I feel that work needs to be done is practically embedding compliance into operational processes, and becoming a true and valuable partner to the business. With the current state of the oil price, we’re likely set for reduced budgets and increased risk, which makes it more important now than ever to share stories, materials and solutions to effectively mitigate compliance risk while enabling business delivery.”

I will be speaking at the conference on internal controls but I am extremely pleased to be co-leading an in-depth workshop on the third day of the event, with Joe Oringel, guest blogger and Managing Director at VisualRisk IQ. In our workshop, you will learn how to implement a system of data-driven monitoring controls and documents to measure the effectiveness of your compliance program and get you through a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) investigation. During our 3 hour session we will go into the weeds on the following:

  • Understanding what internal controls are required under a best practices compliance program;
  • Recognizing what FCPA enforcement actions tell us about internal controls in an anti-corruption compliance program;
  • Getting to grips with what the SEC expects you to have in place;
  • Competently documenting the effectiveness of your internal controls;
  • Understanding best practices and a methodology for the use of data analytics in compliance and ethics organization;
  • Prioritizing business and compliance questions that can be answered with analysis of digital data; and
  • Identifying a learning plan and resources to enhance your team’s data analytics expertise

I hope that you can attend this most excellent FCPA conference with the two-day sessions on April 28 and 29 and the workshop day on April 30. Very few FCPA conferences focus on Supply Chain and the information that you will receive at this one will be first rate. Finally, Hanson Wade has allowed me to offer a 20% discount to readers of my blog. You can obtain it by entering the code TFLaw20 when you register online. For the conference brochure and full details regarding the agenda and registration, click here.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

April 8, 2015

The WPA and More Productive Compliance Meetings

WPA LogoOn this day 80 years ago, Congress created the Works Progress Administration (WPA), a central part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The WPA was established under the Emergency Relief Appropriation Act, as a means of creating government jobs for some of the nations many unemployed. Under the direction of Harry L. Hopkins, the WPA employed approximately 8 million people who worked on 1.4 million public projects before it was disbanded in 1943. Its programs were extremely popular and contributed significantly to Roosevelt’s landslide reelection in 1936.

I have always been amazed at the variety of works that the WPA had a hand in creating, from vast public building projects like the construction of highways, bridges, and dams to the careers of several important American artists, including Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. Many of the most interesting art deco buildings still in use were built during the 1930s through the auspices of the WPA.

While the WPA constructed and led to many good works during its existence, one of the banes of corporate existence is the number of meetings that one must attend. Even worse than the raw number of meetings is the lack of any good that comes out of most meetings. Most meeting organizers have no clue how to run a successful or even useful meeting. I thought about this when I read a recent article in the Houston Business Journal (HBJ), entitled “10 ways to make your next meeting more productive by Dana Manciagli.

Manciagli began her piece by noting that researchers from the London School of Economics and Harvard University found that business leaders “spend 60% of their time in meetings, and only 15% working alone.” While this statistic alone is troubling enough, when you overlay that with the number of meetings where nothing is accomplished, it is clear to me you have a complete waste of time and resources. I do recognize that some companies have taken accomplishing nothing in meetings as a matter of corporate policy. General Motors (GM) took this to an art form in the well-documented GM Nod, which signified that there was agreement on an issue but that no one would actually do anything about it.

But for those who might want to actually accomplish something in a meeting, Manciagli pointed to Andrea Driessen whom she described as “chief boredom buster” at Seattle-based No More Bored Meetings . How is that for a moniker and company name? Manciagli related Driessen’s top ten tips for developing, running and ultimately having a successful meeting.

  1. Be a Know-it-all

Manciagli writes that because it is “natural to disengage when meeting content isn’t relevant. The most effective meeting hosts review all potential agenda segments to determine whether they apply to all attendees. If participants already know a particular content slice, then simply don’t cover that segment for the broader audience. Or if you have vastly different levels of awareness in the room, divide people accordingly to ensure maximum relevance for all.” Of course this means you will need to put some thought into your pre-meeting planning.

  1. No Problem? No Meeting!

We have all been subjected to it, the daily, weekly, monthly meeting check-in to see how the project is progressing. But Manciagli believes that “many of these less-than-productive meetings could be canceled or shortened if we identified the problem the meeting is intended to solve. And if we can’t find an identifiable problem, then don’t have the meeting.” Manciagli concludes, “Sometimes, it’s that simple.”

  1. Get Real

This is another pre-meeting planning point. Do you try to squeeze 13 action items for discussion and resolution into a 30-minute meeting? Conversely you do not need to book a 60-minute window to handle a couple of points. If you can handle a matter via email or need to go offline, do so.

  1. Prioritize, Prioritize, Prioritize!

Like its related cousin, Document, Document and Document, this phase should be more than simply a catchword. It should be an action item in your meeting planning process. Tackle your important issues first to “save time and solve your most pressing problem.”

  1. Play “Pass the Pad” To Avoid Late Arrivals

The biggest offender of this rule is, unfortunately, us lawyers. Why, because we are always (in our eyes) the most important. Yet not being able to start because someone is not present or having to repeat points is one of the worst problems there is around efficient meetings. The article notes, “Meeting productivity suffers when people arrive late, and the punctual are penalized.” Her solution is to require the latecomer to take notes in the meeting, writing “People learn quickly that they can either be on time, or become the dreaded note-taker if they are late. As host, you’ll see positive behavior change with little effort on your part.”

  1. Be a Meeting Bouncer

Manciagli tactfully writes about that “common meeting malady: the tangent talker.” I would perhaps less tactfully say there are way too many people who like to hear the sound of their own voices way too much. Manciagli suggests a little humor by “naming a tangent officer who monitors and records tangents for later. Use that parking lot! And you can lighten it up by using a toy police badge.” Nothing like a little corporate shame to keep things moving.

  1. Make it Multi-Sensory

It is not simply millennials who respond to social media. Most people do better when they are visually engaged. Manciagli suggests using more than simply oral presentations, use other tools, including the following: “Graphic illustration, in which someone draws out ideas in real time; Customer testimonials that emotionally inspire; Quizzes and games; Product demos; Surprise guests; Props that foster kinesthetic learning.”

  1. PPPPP

Everyone understands the Five P rule, aka prior planning prevents poor performance. As a meeting host, this means you must absolutely be prepared prior to the meeting. If there are technical issues, you should pass out that information prior to the meeting. Manciagli pointed out that “the more skin we all have in the game, the more likely we are to own and be accountable to group outcomes.”

  1. Hire an “Accountant”

Accountability. How many meetings have you attended where there was no accountability? Manciagli believes “Most meetings lack built-in accountability structures.” She gives the tangible hint to “ask everyone to record at least one goal related to the meeting that they’ll commit to completing in the next week or month, and have them check in with one another. Teams gain measurable accountability, and you get recognized for generating stronger results tied to your meetings.”

  1. Remember: Humor is No Joke

Humor has a big use in meetings, “The power of humor — if used effectively within the meeting mix — is no laughing matter. Indeed, there is a strong business case to be made for laughing while learning.” It can also lower the stress level in meetings, once again if used properly.

I am sure that you have your own horror stories of aimless, wandering meetings that go nowhere painfully slow. As a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) or compliance practitioner, one of your most valuable items in a corporation is time. You can set an example about running an efficient and productive meeting and then lead your company down the path laid out in the article. Who knows, the results of what you start in your company may last as long as WPA work.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

April 3, 2015

Why Tone at the Top Matters and Join the FCPA Professor in Houston

IMG_1173Over this week I have looked at some issues related to compensation and methods from other disciplines that a compliance practitioner might use to test and then improve a company’s third party management regime. Today, I want to go back to the starting point for any compliance program; that is the Tone at the Top. I was reminded of the absolute necessity of having a management not only committed to following the law but the actual doing of compliance when I read about the guilty verdicts in the Atlanta schools cheating scandal.

In an article in the New York Times (NYT), entitled “Atlanta Educators Are Convicted of Racketeering”, reporter Alan Blinder detailed the guilty verdicts handed down in an Atlanta state Superior Court this week where 11 of 12 defendants were convicted in a lengthy trial. Blinder wrote, “On their eighth day of deliberations, the jurors convicted 11 of the 12 defendants of racketeering, a felony that carries up to 20 years in prison. Many of the defendants — a mixture of Atlanta public school teachers, testing coordinators and administrators — were also convicted of other charges, such as making false statements, that could add years to their sentences.” Most stunningly, the trial judge “ordered most of the educators jailed immediately, and they were led from the courtroom in handcuffs.”

The school district’s top administrator Dr. Beverly Hall, channeling her inner Ken Lay, had the temerity to pass away during the trial so there was no finding as to her conduct. Unrepentant to end she said “she had done nothing wrong and that her approach to education, which emphasized data, was not to blame.” When interviewed back in 2011, Dr. Hall had said, “I can’t accept that there’s a culture of cheating. What these 178 are accused of is horrific, but we have over 3,000 teachers.”

Think about those two statements for a moment. They mimic the same tired excuses used by apologizers in the anti-corruption world. First it was only a small subset of those involved who actually broke the law. In other words, the oldie but goodie rogue employee(s) defense. It did have the notable exception that there were 178 roguies out there lying and cheating. But more than the rogue employee defense, she emphasized that she obtained results, the scores on the State of Georgia’s standardized tests for public schools improved dramatically under her watch. In the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) anti-corruption world that is the same as “we had to do it to compete” argument. It is equally as inane as the rogue employee defense.

Moreover, a State of Georgia investigation “completed in 2011, led to findings that were startling and unsparing: Investigators concluded that cheating had occurred in at least 44 schools and that the district had been troubled by “organized and systemic misconduct.” Nearly 180 employees, including 38 principals, were accused of wrongdoing as part of an effort to inflate test scores and misrepresent the achievement of Atlanta’s students and schools. Investigators wrote in the report that Dr. Hall and her aides had “created a culture of fear, intimidation and retaliation” that had permitted “cheating — at all levels — to go unchecked for years.” How is that for tone from the very top?

I bring you another example from a company I once worked at whose management locked themselves behind bolted doors on a floor in the building not accessible by any employees. And just in case someone did make onto this executive floor, there was an armed police presence as a last ditch security measure. The locked down top floor was after the following security measures were already in place: (1) you had to badge in to get into the parking garage, (2) building access was by card entry, (3) elevator access was by card entry, and (4) floor access was by card entry.

Why would senior executives barricade themselves behind such massive physical protection? Did they do this because crazed competitors were sending in assassins, because the company was so profitable and hence unassailable as a competitor? How about something more nefarious such as international hit squads roaming through international businesses in Houston, picking off key executives? Alas the explanation was not anything so exotic. With all of these security measures in place the reason was to keep mere mortal employees away from senior management. What type of message that does send to employee? Much like the one I had growing up, speak only when spoken to.

The point of all this is that tone does matter. Senior management must be committed and communicate its commitment to not only obeying laws but also complying with laws. In the FCPA world, that means you must have a compliance program in place that meets the Ten Hallmarks of an Effective Compliance Program as set out in the FCPA Guidance.

On a completely different note as a compliance practitioner, if you want to have a shot at some serious professional growth and you are in the Houston area, somewhere else in Texas or anywhere else in the South, I suggest you consider attending the FCPA Professor’s FCPA Institute, which will be held in Houston on Monday, May 4 and Tuesday, May 5. The Professor’s goal in leading this first Texas FCPA Institute is “to develop and enhance fundamental skills relevant to the FCPA and FCPA compliance in a stimulating and professional environment with a focus on learning. Information at the FCPA Institute is presented in an integrated and cohesive way by an expert instructor with FCPA practice and teaching experience.” Some of the topics, which will be covered, include the following:

  • An informed understanding of why the FCPA became a law and what it seeks to accomplish;
  • A comprehensive understanding of the FCPA’s anti-bribery and books and records and internal controls provisions and related enforcement theories;
  • Various realties of the global marketplace which often give rise to FCPA scrutiny;
  • The typical origins of FCPA enforcement actions including the prominence of corporate voluntary disclosures;
  • The “three buckets” of FCPA financial exposure and how settlement amounts in an actual FCPA enforcement action are typically not the most expensive aspect of FCPA scrutiny and enforcement;
  • Facts and figures relevant to corporate and individual FCPA enforcement actions including how corporate settlement amounts are calculated;
  • How FCPA scrutiny and enforcement can result in related foreign law enforcement investigations as well as other negative business effects from market capitalization issues, to merger and acquisition activity, to FCPA related civil suits; and
  • Practical and provocative reasons for the general increase in FCPA enforcement.

In other words, it is what you have come to expect from the FCPA Professor; well-thought out reasoned analysis, practical knowledge and learning, and provocative thinking and assessment. But this is also your chance to attend a two-day Institute with one of the most original thinkers in the FCPA space. The FCPA Institute will provide insights into the topics more near and dear to my heart as a ‘nuts and bolts guy’. In addition to the above substantive knowledge, FCPA Institute participants will gain in-demand, practical skills to best manage and minimize FCPA risk by:

  • Practicing FCPA issue-spotting through video exercises;
  • Conducting a FCPA risk assessment;
  • Learning FCPA compliance best practices, including as to third parties;
  • Learning how to effectively communicate FCPA compliance expectations; and
  • Grading a FCPA code of conduct.

In addition, attorneys who complete the FCPA Institute may be eligible to receive those all-important Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits. The sponsors, King & Spalding, will be seeking CLE credit in CA, GA, NY, TX and if needed in NC and VA. Actual CLE credit will be determined at the end of the program based on actual program time. Attorneys may be eligible to receive CLE credit through reciprocity or attorney self-submission in other states as well.

I hope that you can join the FCPA Professor for this FCPA Institute. I have previously said, “if the FCPA Professor writes about it you need to read it. While you may disagree with him, your FCPA perspective and experience will be enriched by the exercise.” I would now add to this statement that if the FCPA Professor puts on his FCPA Institute you should attend. Not only will you garner a better understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the law and the plain words of its text; you will also be able to articulate many of the issues which befall companies caught up in a FCPA investigation to your senior management in a way that will help them understand the need for a robust compliance program.

To register for the FCPA Institute, or for more information, click here.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

April 2, 2015

Managing Your Third Parties in a FCPA Compliance Program

7K0A0501The building blocks of any Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) anti-corruption compliance program lay the foundations for a best practices compliance program. For instance in the lifecycle management of third parties, most compliance practitioners understand the need for a business justification, questionnaire, due diligence, evaluation and compliance terms and conditions in contracts. However, as many companies mature in their compliance programs, the issue of third party management becomes more important. It is also the one where the rubber meets the road of actually doing compliance.

In the March/April issue of Supply Chain Management Review is an article by Mark Trowbridge, entitled “Put it in Writing: Sharpening Contracts Management to Reduce Risk and Boost Supply Chain Performance”, that provides some useful insights into the management of the third party relationship. While the focus of the article was about having a “strategic approach to contracts management” I found the author’s “five ways to start professionalizing your approach to outsourcing contracts” as steps a compliance practitioner can use in the management of third party relationships, both on the sales side and those which come into your company through the Supply Chain.

By taking his analysis into the compliance realm, I believe there are concrete steps you can take going forward. The key is to have a strategic approach to how you structure and manage your third party relationships. This may mean more closely partnering with your third parties to help manage the anti-corruption compliance risk. It would certainly lead towards enabling your company to “control risk while optimizing the performance” of your third parties. To achieve these goals, I have revised Trowbridge’s prescriptions from suppliers to third parties.

I. Consolidate Third Parties but Retain Redundancy

It is incumbent that consolidation in your third party relationships on the Supply Chain side to a smaller number of suppliers will “yield better cost leverage.” From the compliance perspective it also should make the entire third party lifecycle easier to manage, particularly steps 1-4. However a company must not “over-consolidate” by going down to a single source supplier. Trowbridge advocates a diversified supplier base, with a technique he calls “dual-sourcing”. From the compliance perspective, you may want to have a primary and secondary third party that you work with in a service line or geographic area to retain this redundancy.

II. Keep Tabs on Subcontracted Work

This is one area that requires an appropriate level of management. If your direct contracting party has the right or will need to subcontract some work out, you need to have visibility into this from the compliance perspective. You will need to require and monitor that your direct third party relationship has your approved compliance terms and conditions in their contracts with their subcontractors. You will also need to test that proposition. In other words, you must require, trust and then verify.

III. When Disaster Strikes, Make Sure Your Company is Legally Protected Too

This is where your compliance terms and conditions will come into play. One of the things that I advocate is a full indemnity if your third party violates the FCPA and your company is dragged into an investigation because of the third party’s actions. Such an indemnity may not be worth too much but if you do not have one, there will be no chance to recoup any of your legal or investigative costs. Another important clause is that any FCPA violation is a material breach of contract. This means that you can legally, under the terms of the contract, terminate it immediately, with no requirement for notice and cure. Once again you may be somewhat constrained by local laws but if you do not have the clause, you will have to give written notice and an opportunity to cure. This notice and cure process may be too long to satisfy the Department of Justice (DOJ) or Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) during the pendency of a FCPA investigation. Finally, you need a clause that requires your third party to cooperate in any FCPA investigation. This means cooperation with you and your designated investigation team but it may also mean cooperation with US governmental authorities as well.

You also need the ability to move between third parties if the need arises. This is the redundancy issue raised above. You do not want to be stuck with no approved freight forwarders or other transporters in a certain geographic area. If a compliance related matter occurs, you may well need certain contractual rights to move your work and to require your prime third party to cooperate with the transition to your secondary third party.

IV. Keep Track of Your Third Parties’ Financial Stability

This is one area that is not usually discussed in the compliance arena around third parties but it seems almost self-evident. You can certainly imagine the disruption that could occur if your prime third party supplier in a country or region went bankrupt; but in the compliance realm there is another untoward Red Flag that is raised in such circumstances. Those third parties under financial pressure may be more easily persuaded to engage in bribery and corruption than third parties that stand on a more solid financial footing. You can do this by a simple requirement that your third party provide annual audited financial statements. For a worldwide logistics company, this should be something easily accomplished.

Trowbridge says, “Automated financial tracking tools can also be used to keep track of material changes in a supplier’s financial stability.” You should also use your in-house relationship manager to regularly visit key third party relationships so an on-the-ground assessment can be a part of an ongoing conversation between your company and your third parties.

V. Formalize Incentives for Third Party Performance

One of the key elements for any third party contract under the FCPA or UK Bribery Act is the compensation issue. If the commission rate is too high, it could create a very large pool of money that could be used to pay bribes. It is mandatory that your company link any commission or payment to the performance of the third party. If you have a long-term stable relationship with a third party, you can tie compensation into long-term performance, specifically including long-term compliance performance. This requires the third party to put skin into the compliance game so that they have a vested, financial interest in getting things done in compliance with the FCPA or other anti-corruption compliance regime.

Additionally, as Trowbridge notes, “The fact is, linking contractual compensation to performance does make a significant difference in supplier performance. This is especially valuable when agreed upon key performance indicator (KPI) metrics can be accurately tracked.” This would seem to be low hanging for the compliance practitioner. If you cannot come up with some type of metric from the compliance perspective, you can work with your business relationship team to develop such compliance KPIs.

While Trowbridge’s article focused on the suppliers, I found his ideas easily transferable to the compliance field. Near the end of the article Trowbridge suggested ranking suppliers based upon a variety of factors including performance, length of relationship, benchmarking metrics and KPIs. This is a way for the compliance practitioner to have an ongoing risk ranking for third parties that can work as a preventative and even proscription prong of a compliance program and allow the delivery of compliance resources to those third parties that might need or even warrant them.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

March 12, 2015

Protections for CCOs from Wrongful Termination

Wrongful TerminationThis week the Houston Texans unceremoniously cut the franchise’s greatest player in its short history, receiver Andre Johnson. This was after his being hauled into the office of the head coach and being told that he would only need to work half as hard next year. As reported by Jerome Solomon in the Houston Chronicle article entitled “Move inevitable, but team bungles its handling”, Head Coach Bill O’Brien told Johnson that his catch total would drop from the 84 he has averaged in his 12 year career with the Texans down to “around 40 passes next season.” But O’Brien went on to add the team’s certain Hall of Fame receiver “wasn’t likely to be a starter next season, definitely not for all of the games.” So much for playing your best player at his position on a full-time basis, but hey, at least the information was made public.

Now imagine you are a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) and have been one of your company’s senior management for the better part of the past 12 years. While you may not have been the most important member of the management team you certainly have helped navigate the company through rough compliance waters. Now imagine the company Chief Executive Officer (CEO) who tells you that although he has no one in mind to replace you (other than a less experienced and a smaller-salaried compliance specialist) your services will only be needed half the time in the coming year. What if this is in response to advice the head of the company did not like? What should the response be?

You can consider the departure from MF Global of its Chief Risk Officer, the financial services equivalent of a CCO. As reported in a New York Times (NYT) article entitled “MF Global’s Risk Officer Said to Lack Authority” Ben Protess and Azam Ahmed reported that the company replaced its Chief Risk Officer, Michael Roseman, after he “repeatedly clashed with Mr. Corzine [the CEO] over the firm’s purchase of European sovereign debt.” He was given a large severance package and left the company. When he left, there was no public reason given. His replacement was brought into the position with reduced authority.

If you are a public company, you may well need to heed the advice of fraud and compliance expert Jonathan Marks, a partner at Crowe Horwath LLP, who advocates that any time a CCO, a key executive, is dismissed it should be an 8K reporting event because the departure may be a signal of a change in the company’s attitude towards compliance or an alleged ethical breach had taken place. A similar view was expressed by Michael W. Peregrine in a NYT article entitled “Another View: MF Global’s Corporate Governance Lesson”, where he wrote that a “compliance officer is the equivalent of a “protected class” for governance purposes, and the sooner leadership gets that, the better.” Particularly in the post Sarbanes-Oxley world, a company’s CCO is a “linchpin in organizational efforts to comply with applicable law.” When a company fires (or asks him/her to resign), it is a significance decision for all involved in corporate governance and should not be solely done at the discretion of the CEO alone.

In its Code of Ethics for Compliance and Ethics Professionals, the Society for Corporate Compliance and Ethics (SCCE) has postulated Rule 1.4, which reads, “If, in the course of their work, CEPs become aware of any decision by their employing organization which, if implemented, would constitute misconduct, the professional shall: (a) refuse to consent to the decision; (b) escalate the matter, including to the highest governing body, as appropriate; (c) if serious issues remain unresolved after exercising “a” and “b”, consider resignation; and (d) report the decision to public officials when required by law.” As commentary to this rule, the SCCE said, “The duty of a compliance and ethics professional goes beyond a duty to the employing organization, inasmuch as his/her duty to the public and to the profession includes prevention of organizational misconduct. The CEP should exhaust all internal means available to deter his/her employing organization, its employees and agents from engaging in misconduct. The CEP should escalate matters to the highest governing body as appropriate, including whenever: a) directed to do so by that body, e.g., by a board resolution; b) escalation to management has proved ineffective; or c) the CEP believes escalation to management would be futile. CEPs should consider resignation only as a last resort, since CEPs may be the only remaining barrier to misconduct. A letter of resignation should set forth to senior management and the highest governing body of the employing organization in full detail and with complete candor all of the conditions that necessitate his/her action. In complex organizations, the highest governing body may be the highest governing body of a parent corporation.”

What about compensation? The Department of Justice (DOJ) has made clear that it expects a CCO to resign if the company refuses advice and violates the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). The former head of the DOJ-FCPA unit Chuck Duross went so far as to compare CCOs and compliance practitioners to the Texans at the Alamo. To be fair to Duross, I think he was focusing more on the line in the sand part of the story, while I took that to mean they were all slaughtered for what they believed in. But whichever interpretation you may choose to put on it, the DOJ clearly expects a CCO to stand up and if a CEO does not like what they say, he or she must resign. This puts CCOs and compliance practitioners in a very difficult position, particularly if there is no exit compensation for doing the right thing by standing up.

I think the next step should be for the DOJ and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to begin to discuss the need for contractual protection of CCOs and other compliance practitioners against retaliation for standing up against corruption and bribery. The standard could simply be one that protects a CCO and other compliance practitioners against termination without cause. Just as the SEC is investigating whether companies are trying to muzzle whistleblowers through post-employment Confidentiality Agreements, I think they should consider whether CCOs and other compliance practitioners need more employment protection. I think the SEC should also consider the proposals of Marks regarding the required 8K or other public reporting of the dismissal or resignation of any CCO. Finally, I would expand on Peregrine’s suggestion and require that a company Board of Directors approve any dismissal of a CCO. With these protections in place, a CCO or compliance practitioner would have the ability to confront management who might take business decisions that violate the FCPA.

This publication contains general information only and is based on the experiences and research of the author. The author is not, by means of this publication, rendering business, legal advice, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such legal advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified legal advisor. The author, his affiliates, and related entities shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person or entity that relies on this publication. The Author gives his permission to link, post, distribute, or reference this article for any lawful purpose, provided attribution is made to the author. The author can be reached at tfox@tfoxlaw.com.

© Thomas R. Fox, 2015

 

 

Next Page »

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,412 other followers